Those Old School Lumberjacks That Fell America’s Giant Trees

Ever wondered how humans have managed to say goodbye to America’s giant trees without all those petrol-powered chanisaws? Well, it was defintiely a different life, and different trees to fell.  Can you find the bear?

Lumberjacks pose with a Douglas fir tree in Washington, 1899. IMAGE: CORBIS
Loggers hold a cross-cut saw across a giant Sequoia tree’s trunk in California, 1917. IMAGE: A. R. MOORE/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE/CORBIS
Two workers pose with tools used in logging operation. IMAGE: Humbold Redwoods Project
Loggers and a 10-mule team prepare to fell a giant Sequoia tree in California, 1917. IMAGE: A. R. MOORE/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE/CORBIS
Loggers stand in the trunk of a tree they chopped down at Camp Badger in Tulare County, California. The tree was logged for the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. IMAGE: CORBIS

Lumberjacks pose on the stump of a tree which was displayed at St. Louis World’s Fair, 1904. IMAGE: LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
The Humboldt Northern #2 engine on the Strawberry Creek Trestle, north of McKinleyville, with the engine house (near Baird Road) in the background. IMAGE: HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Lumberjacks float lumber down the Columbia River in Oregon, c. 1910. IMAGE: UNDERWOOD & UNDERWOOD/CORBIS

Over 100 people stand with a logged giant sequoia tree in California, 1917. IMAGE: A. R. MOORE/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE/CORBIS

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